The RGB Universe

Three images bounded to the respective spaces: Colour, Chromaticity, and Hue.

One image bounded to three respective spaces: Colour, Chromaticity, and Hue.

The Colour-Space: RGB
Everyone is familiar with this, it is the additive model for colours that uses the primaries: red, green & blue. A 3D Model where each unique colour sits at position (x: r, y: g, z: b).

The Chromaticity-Space: RCGCBC
Some people will be familiar with this, it is RGB without luminance, the brightness is removed in a way that doesn’t effect the hue or saturation. It is referred to as rg-Chromaticity because it’s construction from RGB means only two elements are needed to represent all the chromaticity values:

Conversion to Conversion from (kind of*)
R_C= \frac{R}{R+G+B}
G_C= \frac{G}{R+G+B}
B_C= \frac{B}{R+G+B}
 R = \frac{R_C G}{G_C}
G = G
B = \frac{(1 - R_C - G_C) G}{G_C}

It will always be that R_C + G_C + B_C = 1 so by discarding the blue component we can have unique chromaticities as (x: r’, y: g’). This means that rg-Chromaticity is a 2D-Model and when converting to it from RGB we lose the luminance. So it is impossible to convert back. *An in-between for this is the colour-space rgG where the G component preserves luminance in the image.

The Hue-Space: RHGHBH
No one uses this, I just thought it would be fun to apply the same as above and extract the saturation from RCGCBC. Like RCGCBC it is a 2D Model, this seems strange because it is only representing one attribute –hue– but it is because the elements themselves have a ternary relationship (how much red, how much green, how much blue) and so to extrapolate one you must know the other two.

Conversion to 3-tuple Hue Normalise to 2D
M = \text{Max}(R,G,B)
m = \text{Min}(R,G,B)
\delta = 255/(M-m)
R_h = (R-m) \delta
G_h = (G-m) \delta
B_h = (B-m) \delta
R_H = \frac{R_h}{R_h + G_h + B_h}
G_H = \frac{G_h}{R_h + G_h + B_h}
B_H = \frac{B_h}{R_h + G_h + B_h}

Measuring Hue Distance
The HSL colour-space records hue as a single element, H, making measuring distance as easy as \Delta H = \sqrt{{H_a}^2 - {H_b}^2} where as in rg-Hue we have two elements so \Delta H = \sqrt{({R''_a}^2 - {R''_b}^2) + ({G''_a}^2 - {G''_b}^2)} where R'' = R_H and G'' = G_H for readability. What’s interesting here is it works almost the same. Though it should be noted that on a line only two distances are equidistant to zero at one time where as in rg-Hue, on a 2D plane, there are many equidistant points around circles.

Below are images of a RGB testcard where each pixel’s hue has been measured against a colour palette (60° Rainbow) and coloured with the closest match. The rg-Hue measure has a notable consistency to it and shows more red on the right hand side than HSL, but also between the yellow and red there is a tiny slither of purple. I believe this is from the equal distance hues and the nature of looking through a list for the lowest value when there are multiple lowest values:

Hue Distance (HSL) Hue Distance (RHGHBH)
HSL Measure rg-Hue Measure
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One thought on “The RGB Universe

  1. Pingback: WavelengthPro Version 2.0 Release Notes | Neural Outlet..

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