MuSh: Multi-Shebang Scripting

MuSh is a super simple meta-scripting language for parsing multiple shebang statements that invoke different interpretors. Why would you want to do this? I have no idea. Although there is no real reason to do this you might want to just for the fun of it.

How it works
MuSh is python based and has a linear approach, it splits up the script into smaller single-language scripts then runs them one after the other. Variables are transported between scripts using a register file (msb_register.json) and hook-in functions which add code to the scripts for interacting with the register. There are two important syntaxes (syntaces?) for separating languages, the first is:

#!! <interpretor> <passed-variables …>

A very simple Guess my Number game that uses Bash, Python and Common Lisp.

A little Guess my Number game that uses Shell, Python and Common Lisp. This example can be found at ‘examples/guess_my_num.msb‘ and uses the Vim syntax file found in the repo at editor_support/mush.vim.

Subscripting
The second separation syntax is for embedded use, it has open and close functionality:

#![ <interpretor> <passed-variables …>
#!] <passed-variables …>

MuSh uses the hook-in function inline_replace which replaces the embedded code with a call to a subscript (of that code). In the example below you can see how a python program might use subscripting to use Lisp. The left is the original, the right is after inline_replace has been called:

def fact_lisp(n):
        #![ clisp n
        (defun fact (n)
                (if (< n 2) 1
                (* n (fact(- n 1)))))
        (setf out (fact n))
        #!] out
        return out
def fact_lisp(n):
	# Get 'n' from register ...
	from subprocess import call
	call("./subscript_0", shell=True)
	# Get 'out' from register ...
	return out

The above code is from ‘examples/fact_speed_IO.msb from the repo. The meta-script starts with a python program that defines three factorial functions using subscripts to Python, Common Lisp, and Shell (sh). These three are called inside a python forloop 1000 times – calculating 10! each loop. Python timing methods are used giving:

 Subscripts Python Common Lisp Shell
Time (seconds) 25.4605309963 18.8304021358 21.1056499481

It also defines a pure python factorial function, which it also loops for. Next the meta-script moves to a Lisp program which has a Lisp forloop and factorial function, timing here is done with (get-internal-real-time) and (internal-time-units-per-second). Finally the meta-script moves to Shell and runs a while loop for its factorial function. These script results seem peculiar to me, Lisp shows to be slower than Python and Shell is almost as bad as subscripting:

 Scripts Python Common Lisp Shell
Time (seconds) 0.002014 0.009645 14

I find it strange that when using a python loop/timing – python was the slowest, but when using native loops/timing – python was the fastest. This could be because my implementation is incorrect somewhere or python just has great looping but bad recursive arithmetic. Maybe it’s a reflection of how python interacts with the register. I’m more confused by why shell is so slow.